Real Estate and *stuff *

Real Estate and *stuff *

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Extra Upgrades With A Lower Price Is Yours In Dudley..

February 3, 2015

Stunning upgrIMG_1860aded new construction in Pierpont Estates is ready for you! Enjoy the holidays in this graciously styled colonial on 2+ acres at the top of the hill with sweeping views. The large upgraded kitchen with gleaming hardwoods, oversized granite island and stainless steel appliances is perfect for holiday parties! Sliders to full deck to enjoy the view. Open floor plan with cathedral ceiling fireplace family room, hardwoods and recessed lighting. Formal dining room with wainscoting and formal living room. Upper level features four bedrooms. Private master bathroom with whirlpool tub and granite. Full, dry walk out basement is ready to be finished. 2 car garage. Central a/c, Generac Generator, mature landscaping and irrigation system. You can’t build this house for this price and you don’t have to wait to move in! Low tax rate in Dudley but easy access to major commuting routes. Qualifying location for USDA 0% mortgage.

Call or E-mail for a Showing.IMG_1963

5 Castle Circle, Dudley,MA

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Lower Price With New Construction Is Being Offered In Dudley!

January 12, 2015

castleStunning upgraded new construction in Pierpont Estates is ready for you! Enjoy the holidays in this graciously styled colonial on 2+ acres at the top of the hill with sweeping views. The large upgraded kitchen with gleaming hardwoods, oversized granite island and stainless steel appliances is perfect for holiday parties! Sliders to full deck to enjoy the view. Open floor plan with cathedral ceiling fireplace family room, hardwoods and recessed lighting. Formal dining room with wainscoting and formal living room. Upper level features four bedrooms. Private master bathroom with whirlpool tub and granite. Full, dry walk out basement is ready to be finished. 2 car garage. Central a/c, Generac Generator, mature landscaping and irrigation system. You can’t build this house for this price and you don’t have to wait to move in! Low tax rate in Dudley but easy access to major commuting routes. Qualifying location for USDA 0% mortgage.

Call or e-mail for a showing

5 Castle Circle, Dudley, MA 0151

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Trees You Should Never Plant in Your Yard

October 18, 2012

Cool weather is the best time to plant trees — low temps ease the stress on young trees and give them time to root in before the onset of growing season. But beware! You don’t want to be planting a long-term problem. What to avoid?  Before you head to a nursery, check out these trees that are more trouble than they’re worth.

Credit: A Corner Garden

1. Silver maple (Acer saccharinum)

Big, fast-growing, and a dandy shade tree, silver maple is widespread in eastern states and the Midwest. Unfortunately, the speed at which the tree grows makes for weak, brittle wood that may break during severe storms. The shallow root system invades sewage pipes and drain fields, and is notorious for cracking driveways and walkways.

 

Credit: ©2011 Melissa WILLIAMS / LEAF

2. Ash (Fraxinus)

Sturdy and tough, the many varieties of ash that populate North America are some of our most beloved trees. Professional baseball bats are made from its wood — how American is that? But the venerable ash is threatened by the emerald ash borer, a tiny beetle that’s on track to wipe out the species. If you’re looking for a long-term tree for your yard, look elsewhere.

 

Credit: David Wilson

3. Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides)

The aspen is found in northern climes and higher elevations. Its white bark and gently vibrating leaves are attractive, but its root system is insidious, sending up dozens of suckers that relentlessly try to turn into new trees. Once established, it’s war. In fact, the largest living organism in the world is a Colorado aspen root system called Pando. It weighs 6,600 tons and is thought to be 80,000 years old. Try digging that out!

 

Canadian Forest Service

4. Hybrid Poplars (Populus)

Hybrid poplars are created by cross-pollinating two or more poplar species together. The result can be a fast-growing tree that looks good in your yard — for a while. Hybrid poplars are especially susceptible to diseases, and most won’t last more than 15 years. This poor fellow is dying … quickly.

 

 

Credit: EV Grieve

5. Willow (Salix)

With its long, slender branches that hang down like Rapunzel’s tresses, the willow is one of the most recognizable of all trees. Beautiful on the outside, yes, but the willow has an aggressive, water-hungry root system that terrorizes drain fields, sewer lines, and irrigation pipes. The wood is weak and prone to cracking, and the tree is relatively short-lived, lasting only about 30 years.

 

Credit: Isolino Ferriera and zulufriend/iStockphoto

6. Eucalyptus

Imported from Australia and popularized for their speedy growth — some varieties will shoot up 10 feet in a year — the eucalyptus has a bad rap for suddenly and unexpectedly dropping big, heavy, resin-filled branches. In some areas of Australia, campers are warned not to pitch tents under eucalyptus trees. Its showy bark peels off annually and adds to seasonal maintenance chores.

 

Credit: Casey Trees

7. Bradford pear (Pyrus calleryana)

The Bradford pear was imported to the U.S. from China in the early 1900s as replacement for orchard trees that were dying. With its compact shape and profusion of spring blossoms, the Bradford pear became a suburban favorite — until folks realized that it was highly prone to splitting and cracking when it reached maturity. And those blossoms? They’re on the stinky side of the fragrance scale.

Credit: Andy Heatwole

8. Mountain cedar (Juniperus ashei)

Stay away from the mountain cedar in late winter. This bushy tree, native to the south central U.S., releases massive amounts of pollen during the cooler months, causing severe allergic reactions in many people. Even if you don’t have allergies, planting one in your yard may affect your neighbors.

 

Credit: Remodeling This Life

9. Mulberry (Morus)

Big surface roots, lots of pollen, messy fruit, and shade so dense that grass refuses to grow underneath. What’s to like about the mulberry? If you’re a silkworm, the answer is: Plenty! The mulberry is the silkworm’s only source of food. Silkworm farmers should plant away! Otherwise, you’ll be happier with a different kind of tree in your yard.

 

 

Credit: Jeffrey Beall/Wikipedia

10. Black walnut (Juglans nigra)

Native to North America, this well-known shade tree produces prized cabinet- and furniture-making wood. It also produces pollen and plenty of fruit that’ll drive you, well, nuts when you have to clean it all up in the fall. It’s true sinister side, however, is that it secretes growth-inhibiting toxins that kill nearby plants, wreaking havoc on flower beds and vegetable gardens.

 

 

Credit: Hugh Conlon/What Grows There

11. Leyland cypress (Cupressocyparis leylandii)

These fast-growing evergreen trees are favored for their ability to quickly create a living privacy screen. However, they require constant upkeep and trimming to keep them healthy, and as they get taller they’re increasingly likely to uproot during storms. The center of the tree forms a mass of dried twigs and branches that are considered such a fire hazard that many communities officially caution residents against planting them.